Workout Wednesday: GLUTES-TONING MOVES

Contrary to popular belief, having shapely glutes isn’t all about appearance or vanity. Having a strong rear-end not only helps improve posture and athletic performance, and reduce knee and back pain, it can significantly enhance injury prevention as well.

Here is a simple pre-workout activation circuit to target the glutes:

 

HIP BRIDGES

Lie on your back, bend your knees and position your feet about shoulder-distance apart. Place your arms to the side or across your chest. Raise your hips as high as possible while keeping the knees over the toes. Repeat 15-20 times.

CLAM SHELL

Lie on your side with the knees bent to 90 degrees and your torso facing forward. Raise your top leg but keep the foot touching the other foot. Complete 15-20 repetitions on each side.

 

HIP EXTENSION AND ABDUCTIONS

Assume an athletic-ready stance next to a wall or something secure that you can hold onto. Lift one leg back as high as possible without moving your upper body. Return to the starting position and lift the same leg out to the side (abduction) and return to starting position. Repeat 15-20 times on each leg.

 

Source: acefitness.org

Workout Wednesday: Design Your Own Exercise Routine

The following is a step by step process to develop your own personal exercise program to further your weight loss.

Warm up: (5 minutes): Start your exercise session at a low to moderate pace, giving your body a chance to warm up and get ready for more vigorous movement. Gradually increase your pace by the end of the warm-up period. For especially strenuous activities, such as jumping rope or jogging, warm up for a minimum of 5-10 minutes.

Get moving!: (Exercise 30-60 minutes): Slowly increase your physical activity time until you reach your goal of 30 to 60 minutes daily. Start with a minimum of 10 minutes, three times per day. Build up gradually. Enjoy yourself. Remember low intensity and longer duration, can result in effective conditioning as well.

Cool down / recovery: (5 minutes): After exercise, slow down gradually. Cool down by changing to a less vigorous activity, such as moving from jogging to walking. This process allows your body to relax gradually.

 

Source: Home Fitness Toolkit – Mercy Jefferson Bariatric Center

Please consult your healthcare provider to assure you are OK to start an exercise program.

Disclaimer: This information provided in this content is not intended to be professional training advice. The information provided is for educational purposes only. Always consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning any exercise regimen. All exercises you perform are at your own responsibility and your own risk. Heart of America Bariatrics is not liable or responsible for any injuries incurred during or after performing any exercises included in this content.

Workout Wednesday: Stretching Exercises

Calf Wall Push
Stand facing a wall, about 18 inches away from it. Then lean forward and push your hands against the wall, keeping your heels flat. Count to 10 (or to 20 for a longer stretch). Rest. Repeat. Remember to breathe; do not hold your breath.

 

 

Seated Hamstring Stretch
Sit on the edge of a chair. Straighten your left leg with the heel touching the floor and toes pointing upward. Sitting up straight and keeping a straight back. Put your right hand (or right arm) on the right knee (or the right leg). Hold your left leg gently with your left hand. Slowly glide your left hand forward along the leg. Release your left hand to resume the starting position. Repeat with the other leg.

 

Image result for Seated Hamstring Stretch

 

Side Bend Stretch
Sit on a chair. Look forward. Raise your left arm. Put your right hand on your right thigh. Bend your trunk to the right slowly. Return to starting position. Repeat with the other arm. Hold stretch for 10 seconds You can stand against the wall and do this exercise to achieve better results.
Image result for seating Side Bend Stretch

 

Leg Swing
Hold onto the edge of a table or a cabinet with a hand to maintain balance, straighten your right leg and swing it forward and backward – slow and controlled. Repeat 10 times. Repeat with the other leg. Caution: Avoid fast swinging movements.

 

Image result for Leg Swing

 

Source: Home Fitness Toolkit – Mercy Jefferson Bariatric Center

Disclaimer: This information provided in this content is not intended to be professional training advice. The information provided is for educational purposes only. Always consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning any exercise regimen. All exercises you perform are at your own responsibility and your own risk. Heart of America Bariatrics is not liable or responsible for any injuries incurred during or after performing any exercises included in this content.

WORKOUT WEDNESDAY:STANDING AB EXERCISES

Begin by completing each movement for 10 seconds; gradually increase by 10 seconds each round. The only equipment you’ll need is a medicine ball with handles or a weight plate for appropriate exercises.

RIBBONS

Start at the right hip and move diagonally over your head to the opposite hip.

TWISTS

Hold the weight in front of you and squeeze the glutes to avoid hip movement.

OVERHEAD LEAN

Extend the arms overhead while slowly leaning the upper body to the right and then to then left.

ONE-HANDED TOSS

Begin in a standing athletic position. Toss the medicine ball from the right hand to the left hand while contracting the abdominals.

RUGBY PASS

Hold the ball in two hands as if you are going to “pass” the ball laterally to someone. Brace your core and pass the ball from the right hip across the body; return to the starting position

SIDE DIPS

Hold the ball in one hand and stand up tall. Place the other hand on your head to help keep your shoulders back. Slowly lean to the side while keeping your torso squared and neck aligned with your spine.

Source: acefitness.org

Workout Wednesday: USING STAIRWAY FOR EXERCISING

Following is a list of ideas that may give you a new vision on the stairs that you pass every day, either as separate moves or as an integrated 15-minute workout.

Note: For any specific joint issues, please adapt as prudent for your individual needs, including skipping any particular movement sequence.

CARDIORESPIRATORY

1. TWO FORWARD, ONE BACK

Set-up: At the bottom of the stairs, facing up

Execution: At a comfortably challenging pace, walk or run the right foot and then the left foot to the first step. Repeat with the right and left foot to the next step. Moving backward, move down one step with the right foot and then the left foot. Repeat this format of “two-up, one down” to the top of the stairs.

2. TWO-BY-TWO

Two-by-Two

Set-up: At the bottom of the stairs, facing up

Execution: At a comfortably challenging pace, walk-run up the stairs, moving up two stairs at a time. When you reach the top, turn around and walk down the stairs normally. Repeat as able for three to five minutes.

3. OPENING ICE SKATING

Opening Ice Skating

Set-up: At the bottom center of the stairs, facing up

Execution: Step the right foot to the first or second step as far to the right as possible. Step the left foot to the second or third step as far left as possible. Continue to the top in the same “ice skating” movement, weaving the body to the right and left on the ascent.

4. CLOSING ICE SKATING

Closing Ice Skating

Set-up: At the bottom center of the stairs, facing up

Execution: Step the right foot to the first or second step as far to the left as possible, crossing the midline of the body. Step the left foot to the second or third step as far right as possible. Continue to the top in the same “ice skating” way, weaving the body to the right and left on the ascent.

STRENGTH/ENDURANCE

The first three strength/endurance skills and drills involves moving from the bottom to the top of the stairs. At the top, turn around and walk down to the starting point to repeat the entire sequence for a period of three to five minutes.

 

5. PUSH-UPS UP (THE STAIRCASE)

Push-ups Up

Set-up: At the bottom center of the stairs, face the stairs with your feet together. Place your right hand on a step that is slightly above your chest level, and your left hand slightly below. Lower your chest as you are able toward the stairs.

Execution: Push yourself to the starting position with extended elbows. Lower and repeat twice more. Change hand positions so the left hand starts higher than your chest, and right hand starts lower than your chest, and do three more push-ups. Slowly “crawl” your way to the next step or two up the staircase, walking your feet first and then your hands. Continue for three to five minutes total or until fatigue sets in from plank position.

6. CRISSCROSS ABDUCTION SQUATS MOVING LEFT

Crisscross Abduction Squats Moving Left

Set-up: At the bottom center of the stairs, face to the right so the left side of your body faces the stairs. Place your left foot on the first or second stair and squat down.

Execution: Stand and abduct the right hip so the right leg lifts to the side. Place the right foot of your lifted leg on the next step, crossing in front of your left foot. Squat down as you contact the stairs. Maintaining the squat, uncross your legs as you place your left foot on the next step. Repeat from the start of the exercise, moving up the stairs.

7. CRISSCROSS ABDUCTION SQUATS MOVING RIGHT

Follow the directions for the previous exercise, but begin facing to the left at the bottom center of the stairs. Repeat everything moving upward on the right side of the body.

The following exercises start at the top of the stairs.

8. ECCENTRIC TRICEPS LOWERING

Eccentric Triceps Lowering

Set-up: Sit at the top of the stairs and place your fingers over the edge of the first step where you’re sitting.

Execution: Using your triceps, slowly lower yourself toward the next step, flexing your elbows and moving your glutes toward a contact point with the floor. As a progression, keep one foot off of the floor during the lowering. Repeat for three to five minutes or until you reach the bottom of the stairs. If your stairs are short, stand, walk to the top and repeat.

FLEXIBILITY AND BALANCE

 

9. LONG LEVER SIDE PLANK BALANCE

Long Lever Side Plank Balance

Set-up: From the bottom center of the stairs, face the right side with feet together

Execution: Place your left hand, fingers spread, on to a stair that is approximately opposite your hip. Lean to the left, keeping the left shoulder abducted, and abduct the right shoulder, forming a letter “T” with the entire body. Your feet will be stacked on the floor, left side of the left foot against the floor. As a progression, abduct the right hip. Try to hold the position for 30-60 seconds, and repeat facing the left side.

10. TWISTING HIP AND LEG STRETCH

Long Lever Side Plank Balance

Set-up: From the bottom center of the stairs, facing the stairs

Execution: Place your hands shoulder-width apart on the step across from your chest or just below; keep the elbows extended. Place your right foot to the right of your right hand, gently stretching the right glute. Gently extend the spine, pushing the hips toward the stairs, opening the left hip area. As a progression, rotate to the right, abducting the right shoulder perpendicular to your spine. Hold for 30-60 seconds and repeat facing the right side.

Source: acefitness.org

Disclaimer: This information provided in this content is not intended to be professional training advice. The information provided is for educational purposes only. Always consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning any exercise regimen. All exercises you perform are at your own responsibility and your own risk. Heart of America Bariatrics is not liable or responsible for any injuries incurred during or after performing any exercises included in this content.

Workout Wednesday: Exercises to Improve Hip Pain

Hip pain is a common problem for sedentary and non-sedentary individuals. Common causes of hip pain include:

  1. Chronic Sitting

The average American sits 13 hours a day. This staggering amount of inactivity causes an imbalance of the hip musculature. The hip flexors remain in a shortened position, while the glutes and deep hip rotators remain elongated. Add to that chronic dehydration and the result is tissue that more closely resembles beef jerky than healthy muscle tissue.

This tissue lacks the necessary flexibility and elasticity to allow for smooth and efficient movement. It tears more easily and becomes overstressed more easily, and the rigidity of the tissue leads to more rubbing against bone and bursae.

  1. Strength Imbalance

A strength imbalance is not the same as tightness or inelasticity. A strength imbalance occurs most often when one’s exercise regimen is consistent and unvaried. The repetition of the same movement without variation builds strength in some muscles, while neglecting others. This imbalance puts an unnatural amount of strain on those muscles, resulting in overuse injury. Try to alternate the type of exercises you do throughout the week.

  1. Skeletal Imbalance

Here, skeletal imbalance refers to the uneven stature or movement pattern that many of us demonstrate, which can be caused by so many things, including old injuries and leg-length discrepancies. When movements are not even or balanced bilaterally, one side will be the victim of added pressure, tissue friction or workload. You can get help from a physiotherapist or exercise physiologist to work on improving movement and posture.

How to improve this problem at home?

Improving the elasticity of that beef jerky-like tissue is best achieved through a combination of homework and loaded movement training. Two to three hours of movement each week is not enough to undo 100+ hours of inactivity each week. Here is a homework assignment for you to add to your regular workout routine: 

Daily Static stretch shortened muscle tissue for more than 60 seconds at least once daily.
Hourly Stand up and perform 10 bodyweight squats or chair sits every hour to get the muscles working and moving.
Nutrition Drink water all day. At least 64 oz a day. If you are well-hydrated, the hourly movement will pull water into the muscles, turning the jerky back into elastic tissue.

Source: acefitness.org

Disclaimer: This information provided in this content is not intended to be professional training advice. The information provided is for educational purposes only. Always consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning any exercise regimen. All exercises you perform are at your own responsibility and your own risk. Heart of America Bariatrics is not liable or responsible for any injuries incurred during or after performing any exercises included in this content.

Workout Wednesday: TRX Core-blasting Workout

You know it when you feel it—when you feel strong in movement, stable when you’re trying not to and balanced in posture. It all comes from a strong core. In broad, uncomplicated terms, the “core” is everything from your hips to your armpits.

But training the core isn’t as fun as it used to be. There are too many misguided, frequently incorrect efforts to list off all the things you should avoid when training the core. You’re never supposed to crunch, you should only train anti-rotation exercises because, some espouse, rotation is “dangerous,” and you should only train the core using standing exercises. Extreme views are usually an unwise approach in life. The core is best trained with an inclusive approach and that means there are few exercises that are absolutely wrong, provided you know what you’re trying to do and how to do it.

One of your Heart of America Bariatrics Dietitian’s favorite workout equipment is the TRX. TRX is used for  suspension training winch is a strength training that uses a system of ropes and webbing called a “suspension trainer” to allow users to work against their own body weight. Suspension training is a really good way to work you core and have fun at the same time.

Follow the workout plan below to start working you core by using a  TRX Suspension Trainer:

The Plan: Perform the following six exercises two times as a circuit. These exercises are best done with time-based sets, because counting reps doesn’t fit well with the variables we are using. Start with a work-to-rest ratio of (20 seconds work:20 seconds rest.) In week two, increase work to 25 seconds. For weeks three and four, increase work to 30 seconds. Perform this circuit three to four times per week.

The Wildcard: Once per week, mix up the order of the exercises any way you like; for example, odd numbers before even, pair up exercises that add up to seven (6 and 1, 5 and 2, etc.), or in reverse order from 6 to 1, or your own fun idea.

The Exercises: The name of each exercise is followed by a parenthetical list of the variables that are challenged by each movement. Wherever you see “(2 sets)” listed, perform one set on each side before continuing to the next exercise. All of the exercises except #5 below (which is set to mid-length) use a length setting that allows you to have your feet in the foot cradles.

Exercise

Asymmetry

Stability

Mobility

Speed

1. Rocking Bicycle (alternate sides each rep)

X

X

 

X (fast)

2. Semi-tucked Knee Tuck (2 sets)

X

 

X

 
3. Pendulum Mountain Climber

X

X

 

X (fast)

4. Knee Tuck to Pike  

X

X

X (slow)

5. Standing Side Plank + Push or Chop (2 sets)

X

X

X

 
6. Hip Roll With Thread the Needle (2 sets)

X

X

X

 

Note: “Speed” as a variable could potentially be confusing. It does NOT always mean fast. “Speed” is a “rate of movement.” In the table, “slow” and “fast” refer to moving either faster or slower than the default speed you would use if no speed direction were provided.

Not included in this workout are static planks, which are typically the standard go-to for core training. Life is about movement and that’s what we are training here. Planks can be thought of as a prerequisite or stepping-stone to challenging core movement. They should not be considered as an end-point in training.

Rocking Bicycle

Rocking Bicycle

Semi-tucked Knee Tuck

Semi-tucked Knee Tuck

Pendulum Mountain Climber

Pendulum Mountain Climber

Knee Tuck to Pike

Knee Tuck to Pike

Standing Side Plank + Push or Chop

Standing Side Plank + Push or Chop

Hip Roll With Thread the Needle

Hip Roll With Thread the Needle

 

Disclaimer: This information provided in this content is not intended to be professional training advice. The information provided is for educational purposes only. Always consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning any exercise regimen. All exercises you perform are at your own responsibility and your own risk. Heart of America Bariatrics is not liable or responsible for any injuries incurred during or after performing any exercises included in this content.

Source: acefitness.org by Jonathan Ross

Workout Wednesday: No-equipment Needed Workout

No equipment? No excuses. This fun and effective equipment-free workout combines six creative exercises into one complete total-body workout that will improve your fitness using nothing more than your own body weight.

Complete this workout on two or three non-consecutive days a week, performing each exercise in the order given, resting no more than 30 to 60 seconds between exercises. Repeat the entire series of exercises a total of two to three times, resting one to two minutes in between rounds.

Half Get-up and Open

Half get-up

half get-up

Lie on your back with the left leg extended and the right knee bent. Place the right foot on the floor and extend the right arm toward ceiling. Perform a crunch-like movement to lift the upper body, transitioning into a seated position, and continue to reach the right arm up. Place the left hand on the floor next to the left hip and push through the left hand and the right foot to lift the hips off the floor. Extend through the hips, reaching back with the right arm to perform a slight backbend. Slowly lower back down to the starting position. Repeat five to six reps on the right side before switching to the left.

Crisscross Jacks

crisscross jacks

Begin standing with your feet together. As you exhale, jump the feet out wide and straighten arms out to the side. From there, scissor the legs, crossing the left leg in front of the right, as the left arm crosses over the right at chest level. Immediately repeat, alternating sides each time. Complete a total of 10 to 12 reps. 

Sumo Squat Thrust 

sumo squat thrust

sumo squat thrust

Stand with feet slightly wider than shoulder width, toes angled out slightly. Keep your core engaged as you hinge at the hips, lowering into a sumo squat position while simultaneously keeping the hands positioned in front of the chest. Release the hands to the floor and jump or step back to a high-plank position; be sure to maintain a neutral spine. Reverse the squat thrust, jumping or stepping feet back toward the hands and rising up to the starting position. Complete a total of eight to 10 reps. 

Combo Lunge

Combo Lunge

Begin standing with feet together. Step the right foot forward and bend the knees into a forward lunge, keeping the right knee in line with the second toe of the right foot; extend the arms forward and drive the fingertips toward the right foot. Push off the right foot and briefly balance on the left leg, keeping the right knee bent 90 degrees and bending both elbows; the palms should be facing one another. With control, step the right foot back into a reverse lunge position, bending both knees while simultaneously reaching both arms overhead. Reverse the movement and return to the starting position. Complete a total of eight to 10 reps on the right side before switching to the left.

Plank-up With a Twist 

Plank up

plank up

Begin in a forearm plank position. Press the right hand into the floor and then the left hand, rising to a high-plank position. Rotate your body to the right and extend the left arm toward the sky for a side-plank variation, allowing the left leg to scissor over the top of the right, with the inner edge of the left foot and the outer edge of the right foot touching the floor. Return to plank position. Release the right forearm back down to the floor and then the left forearm to return to the starting position. Repeat the sequence, this time starting with the left hand and coming to a left side-plank position. Continue the movement pattern without pausing, alternating sides. Complete a total of 10 to 12 reps (five to six reps per side). 

Single-leg Glute Bridge

Single-leg glute bridge

Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet flat on the floor, approximately hip-width distance apart. Lift the left leg up so that the leg is straight and the thighs are parallel. As you exhale, keep the core engaged and lift the hips off the floor. Hold for one to two seconds, and slowly lower down to starting position. Complete 10 to 12 reps on the right side before switching to the left.

Source: by Jessica Matthews at acefitness.org

Disclaimer: This information provided in this content is not intended to be professional training advice. The information provided is for educational purposes only. Always consult your physician or healthcare professional before beginning any exercise regimen. All exercises you perform are at your own responsibility and your own risk. Heart of America Bariatrics is not liable or responsible for any injuries incurred during or after performing any exercises included in this content.

 

Workout Wednesday: Making Time for Exercise

Finding time to exercise can be very difficult, especially if you work, have children, and have other time constraints. The most important thing is that you do make the time for it. Make good use of your time by stretching, doing sit-ups, and lifting cans of food, water bottles or milk jugs while watching TV.

It does not matter what time of day you exercise. It is a good idea to exercise at the same time every day if possible because you get in the habit of doing it before work, during your lunch break, after work or after dinner. Try waking up 30 minutes earlier and getting your exercise in before work or your daily activities. Park your car further away from work so you have to walk 10 to 15 minutes to get to work and 10 to 15 minutes to get back to your car. This guarantees you will get some exercise in during the day even if you don’t have much time for it.

Spring is a great time to be active outdoors with gardening, cutting the grass, and washing or waxing the car. Instead of just letting the dog out, take the dog for a walk. Both of you will get the exercise you need and your dog will love it. Instead of watching an extra half hour of television, get outside and play with your kids on the playground or take them for a bike ride at a local park. Try making an after-dinner walk a daily, fun, family event!

 

Remember that exercise not only helps you lose weight, but it also can help you deal with stress, can give you an energy boost, help you sleep better, improve your mood, and can help protect you against various diseases. Don’t forget that exercise can be fun, too, if you choose activities that you enjoy!

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