Obesity by the Numbers

We all know that obesity is a major public health problem in the United States, but do you know to what extent? Let’s take a look at just how big of a problem obesity has become and where this obesity epidemic is projected to go…

Currently over one third of the US population is considered obese (BMI of 30+) with about 6% considered severely obese (BMI of 40+). It has been projected that by the year 2030, 42% of Americans may be obese and 11% will be severely obese. While this is not exactly news, obesity can significantly increase your risk for developing Type 2 Diabetes, heart disease, stroke, cancers, and many other conditions. The obesity epidemic, along with those co-morbid conditions, will certainly only continue to increase in numbers without intervention. It is also predicted that if obesity rates rise as expected, it will cost the country $549.5 billion in weight-related medical expenditures between now and 2030. It has been estimated that obese men cost an additional $1,152 per year, while obese women cost an additional $3,613 per year.

While there are many means to improving lifestyle and losing weight, having bariatric surgery is one way you can work towards decreasing healthcare spending costs. It often lessens your need for medications, so this leads to less money spent out of your pocket and by your insurance company. It often leads to fewer sick days taken from work, so it saves your employer money. Weight loss also helps to prevent chronic diseases for which you would have to frequently visit your doctor or even a hospital for. By losing weight and leading a healthier life, you are not only saving money, but are likely also saving your life.

Do something today so you are not part of the obesity statistics tomorrow.

References: http://www.usatoday.com/news/health/story/2012-05-07/obesity-projections-adults/54791430/1

Cauliflower Stir Fry

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cabbage, shredded (you can use pre-shredded bag, too)
  • 1 cup cauliflower, riced (you can use frozen, too)
  • 1 cup frozen peas
  • 1 onion, diced
  • 1 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 1/2 tsp sea salt
  • 1 tsp fresh ginger, minced
  • 1/2 lemon, juiced
  • 1/2 tsp turmeric
  • 1/2 tsp cumin
  • 1 tsp curry

Directions

Prep: 1. Using a food processor, shred the cabbage and rice the cauliflower. 2. If using frozen riced cauliflower, defrost 1 cup. Make: 1. Heat coconut oil in large saute pan. Add onion plus 1/4 tsp salt and cook until onion softens, about 3 minutes. 2. Add shredded cabbage (you might have to do this in batches). 3. Once all the cabbage is in the saute pan, stir in ginger, spices and remaining salt.Then add peas and cauliflower and mix gently to combine. 4. Top with lemon before serving.
.

Nutrition Information Per Serving (based on 4 servings)

Calories 84; Protein 2.81 g; Fat 3.89 g; Carbs 10.72 g; Fiber 2.78 g; Sugar 4.02 g
Source: Gatheredtable.com

Tips for Dealing with Constipation after Bariatric Surgery

People normally have bowel movements ranging from a few times a week to two to three times daily. After weight-loss surgery, the number and consistency of bowel movements will change. Missing a bowel movement does not mean you have constipation. Rather, if the consistency of your stool is hard and it is difficult to pass, that is considered constipation.
During the period immediately after weight-loss surgery, you will likely have fewer bowel movements. This is because you are eating very little. Later, you may experience constipation. Common causes in the first few months after surgery include inadequate fiber consumption due to limited stomach capacity and an emphasis on eating enough protein. Also, inadequate fluid consumption is a common culprit.

If it has been awhile since your surgery but you are still having issues with constipation, before you start adding a fiber supplement try to add fiber through your diet by doing the “Seven-day 3-2-1 challenge” – where you consume 3 servings of fruits/vegetables (1 serving = ½ cup), drink 2 liter of water (or 64 oz), and have 1 serving of oats or bran-containing products (1 serving = ½ cup) food each day for a full week. If after the seven days your bowel movements don’t improve, experiment with the following fiber supplements until you find what works for you. Start with the smallest dosage and increase as tolerated. For products containing inulin limit dosage to no more than 10-15 grams/day. For products with wheat dextrin you can take higher dosages – 30-45 grams/day. As you add more fiber to your diet either from foods or supplements make sure to also increase fluid intake.

  • Alive (Nature’s Way)
  • Benefiber
  • Citrucel
  • Fiber Choice
  • Konsyl or Konsyl Balance or Konsyl Fiber betic
  • Metamucil
  • Natural brand Supper Fiber by GNC
  • Nature Made Fiber
  • Regular Girl On the Go
  • Phillips Fiber Good Gummies

 

 

Summer Produce: What’s In Season from A to Z

There is a lot of produce in season during the summer months, so  We all know about melons, berries, peaches, tomatoes and corn being in season this time of year, but there are many other less-common options to try this time of year. Fruits and vegetables have a lot of vitamins, minerals, fiber and antioxidants that provide many health benefits, so try some new ones and find a new favorite.

Apricots are creamy to orange-colored fruits that are rich in vitamin A, vitamin C, potassium and fiber. You want to choose apricots that are plump, firm and uniformly colored. Store them at room temperature until they are ripe and then they can stay fresh in the refrigerator in a plastic bag for 3 to 5 days.

Breadfruit is a great source of fiber, B and C vitamins and potassium. It has a green skin that will darken while in the refrigerator and will typically last one week in the refrigerator.

Crenshaw Melon is a cross between cantaloupe and casaba melons. It is a great source of vitamin C and vitamin B6. Choose melons with a waxy, golden-pink flesh, with a soft rind at the large end. Avoid blemishes and those that are green. Whole melons can be stored at room temperature for up to 2 weeks, but after they are cut they should be refrigerated and consumed within 5 days.

Endive is very closely related to the dandelion plant, is a good source of vitamin C, calcium, iron, phosphorus and potassium. Choose endive heads that are crisp and bright green and you can store this in the refrigerator for up to one week.

Green Soybeans (Edamame) are a good source of protein, vitamin A, calcium, and iron. This is the only vegetable that contains all nine essential amino acids. Choose beans that are crisp and blemish-free and keep them in a perforated plastic bag in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days.

Lychees are an excellent source of vitamin C. They have red shells and you want fruits that are heavy for their size and if you want a sweeter taste, choose ones with brown patches. Lychees can be refrigerated in a plastic bag for up to 10 days.

Okra can be boiled, fried or pickled and is a great source of vitamin C, folate, magnesium and fiber. Choose bright, firm pods and store it in the refrigerator for up to 3 days.

Tomatillo is a staple in Mexican salsas and is a low-calorie source of vitamin C.  You should choose dry, hard tomatillos with tightly fitting husks. Refrigerate them in the crisper drawer for 2-3 weeks.

Zucchini is high in vitamin C, manganese and molybdenum. Choose zucchini with skin clear of blemishes, but is slightly prickly. It can be stored in the refrigerator for 4 to 5 days and should not be washed until you are ready to use it.

Source: http://www.fruitsandveggiesmorematters.org/?page_id=996

Mango Cilantro Green Smoothie

Ingredients

  • ½ banana
  • 3 inch piece of cucumber
  • 1 cup fresh spinach leaves
  • 1 cup frozen mango
  • ¼ cup plain Greek yogurt
  • ½ cup almond milk
  • 2 tablespoons cilantro leaves (1 big pinch!)
  • 1/2 lime, juices

Directions

Prep: 1. Chop and measure all ingredients Make: 1. Add all of your ingredients to a blender and puree until smooth. Makes 1 entree sized smoothie or 2 snack sized ones.
.

Nutrition Information Per Serving (based on 1 serving):

Calories 165; Protein 9.74 g; Fat 1.9 g; Carbs 30.11 g; Fiber 3.74 g; Sugar 18.98 g.
Source: Gatheredtable.com

Easy Homemade Turkey Breakfast Sausage

Ingredients

  • 1 pound ground turkey
  • 2 teaspoons fresh sage, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh rosemary, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon fresh thyme, chopped
  • ½ teaspoon garlic powder
  • ½ teaspoon cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon sea salt
  • Cooking spray (my favorite is Smart Balance® Non-Stick Cooking Spray)

Directions

Prep: 1. Chop herbs. Make: 1. Place turkey, herbs, and salt in a bowl a mix together using your hands to combine. 2. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour or overnight. 3. Form mixture into four patties no more than 1/2″ thick. 3. Use cooking spray to coat skillet and cook sausages in batches about 5 minutes per side or until no longer pink in the middle [center must reach 165°F]. 4. You can also bake in a 400°F oven on parchment-lined baking sheet for 25 minutes.
.

Nutrition Information Per Serving based on 4 servings

Calories 172; Protein 22.44 g; Fat 8.75 g; Carbs 1.07 g; Fiber 0.54 g; Sugar 0.03 g
Source: Gatheredtable.com

7 Mindful Eating Strategies that Can Help You “Eat Better”

Set your intention.

Mindful eating is eating with intention and attention. Assuming that your intention is to feel great, think of dietary changes as choices you make in order to feel your best both short and long term (rather than some externally applied diet).

Consider what your body needs.

When deciding what to eat, ask three questions: What do I want? What do I need? and What do I have? The question “What do I need?” is all about acknowledging your personal health needs, including medical issues, allergies and reactions, family history, and health goals.

Use nutrition information as a tool, not a weapon.

Nutrition knowledge is helpful for making decisions, but it is not the only criteria for deciding what to eat.

Balance eating for nourishment with eating for enjoyment.

There is room in your diet for foods eaten for pleasure! In fact, regularly including foods you love makes it less likely that you will overeat those foods because you ran out of willpower. While it may seem counter-intuitive, when you are free to eat whatever you want, food loses the power it had over you so you don’t even need willpower! As a result, your choices are likely to be more balanced instead of “all of nothing.”

Don’t miss the lesson.

One of the many benefits of mindful eating is that your awareness helps you make connections between what and how much you eat and how you feel—as well as how you feel and what or how much you eat! This direct feedback is very helpful for making changes in order to feel good – not to be good.

Recognize and address your non-hunger triggers for eating.

When a craving doesn’t come from hunger, eating will never satisfy it. By learning to meet your other needs in more effective ways, you won’t use food for that purpose nearly as often.

Eating is for fueling living.

In our food-abundant, diet- and weight-obsessed culture, eating occupies too much of our time, attention, and energy. Your were born with the instinctive ability to eat enough food to fuel your life. Learning how to get back to that place where you can trust your ability to manage your eating without a bunch of rules gives you a pattern of eating that you can sustain almost effortlessly.

 

Source: amihungry.com

Workout Wednesday: Exercise vs. Activity

Should you do one or the other? Or both?  How do you know which one you’re doing? And what makes them different?

All good questions. And all can be a challenge to answer.

Exercise IS activity. But activity is NOT necessarily exercise. For instance, you might be among those in the office that say this…

“Since I work at a desk all day I sit on a stability ball. It makes me feel like I’m doing something.”

“To be quite frank, I cannot see any advantage or reason for a person to be using an exercise ball as an office chair,” says Dr. Jack Callaghan, who holds the Canada Research Chair in Spine Biomechanics and Injury Prevention at the University of Waterloo in Ontario.

Dr. Callaghan and his team found no difference in muscle activity by sitting on a ball, chair, or stool. However, other research shows you burn up to 4 more calories per hour. Whoop-dee-doo-da!! You can practically burn that many calories by twiddling your thumbs for the hour.

Let’s try another…

“I use a pedometer and try and get 10,000 steps in by the days end.”

10,000 steps is a lofty goal. That’s somewhere around 5 miles throughout the day. So the question becomes, is running 5 miles at one time better than random steps throughout the day?

You must take into account speed, incline, intensity, heart rate, and other factors when determining the answer to that question. If you put all that down on paper then you will clearly see they are NOT equal. Because, activity is NOT exercise.

Parking further, taking the stairs, doing housework are all great ways to start being more active throughout your day. But that is very different than working all major muscles of the body for 20 total sets at 15 reps per set. It’s also different than riding the bike up and down hills at 85 RPM.

Activity is NOT exercise. Do you see the difference?

Playing basketball for 60 minutes sprinting up and down the floor and jumping every 15 seconds is a fun activity for a lot of people in America. But that is also a workout. The heart rate is up, legs are exhausted afterward and you feel like you’ve worked out.

Exercise IS activity.

Is this making sense? I hope so. If not, this could be a major reason why you’re not seeing results with your exercise program. Maybe you would benefit from working with an trainer or instructor.

Everyone should be active in their daily life. Walk the dog, take the stairs at work, play catch with your kids, work in the garden, and the hundreds of other things you could do to increase your activity.

But if you’re trying to lose weight and get in shape, you MUST be exercising. Specifically at the right intensity level with strength and cardiovascular training. Separate the two and you’ll be on your way to better results!

Easy Mashed Cauliflower With Garlic

Ingredients

  • 1 large head of cauliflower, cut into florets
  • 1/4 cup unsweetened almond milk, plain [or other milk]
  • 1 bulb of garlic
  • sea salt and pepper, to taste

Directions

Prep: 1. Boil water for steaming cauliflower and garlic. 2. Cut cauliflower into florets Make: 1. Once water is boiling, place steamer insert and then cauliflower florets and whole garlic head into the pot and cover. Steam for 10-12 minutes, until very soft. Drain and return cauliflower to pot. Allow garlic to cool a little, then squeeze the roasted garlic cloves out of the skin into pot with cauliflower.. 2. Add in almond milk and salt to the cauliflower and garlic. Mash until smooth.
.

Notes

Cook the cauliflower until it is very soft. If you like you can add 2 tablespoons of plain Greek yogurt to this to make it a little creamier.
.

Nutrition Information (Per Serving based on 4 servings)

Calories 52
Protein 3.16 g
Fat 0.54 g
Carbs 10.4 g
Fiber 2.57 g
Sugar 2.31 g
Source: gatheredtable.com

101 Things to Do Besides Eat

 

Imagine a healthier, energetic you • Walk around the block • Call a friend • Make a list of your Top Ten Reasons to get active • Read a child a book • Make a To Do list • Dance a little • Plan a vacation • Get a massage • Jot a thank you note to someone • Go to bed early • Read a great book • Write in your Awareness Journal • Give yourself a manicure or pedicure • Plan a healthy meal for your family • Surf the Internet • Finish an unfinished project • Walk your dog • Feel your feelings • Volunteer in your community • Start a hobby • Brush your teeth • Tape your favorite show to watch while exercising • Take 5 slow, deep cleansing breaths • Practice an instrument • Balance your checkbook • Plan a party • Say a prayer • Buy yourself some flowers • Do a few sit-ups • Make a phone call to someone you like • Chop veggies to keep on hand • Set your priorities • Try a new hairstyle • Give a massage • Write down something you are proud of this week • Clean out a junk drawer • Play a game with your kids • Try a new route on your walk • Scream! • Plant fresh herbs to use in your cooking • Drink a glass of water • Kiss someone • Try on some clothes • Catch up on your reading for work • Look at old pictures • Rent a video • Smell the roses • Wash your car • Chew some gum • Plan a date for someone special • Swim a few laps • Read Eat What You Love • Take a hot, soothing bath • Update your calendar • Get it off your chest • Build something • Check on an elderly person • Work in your yard • Start your holiday shopping list • Count your blessings • Write a letter • Fold some laundry • Notice your inner conversations • Take a nap • Run an errand • Work on your budget • Take a bike ride • Check your e-mail • Make a positive statement about yourself and repeat often • Give your dog a bath • Start a project you’ve been wanting to get around to • Send a birthday card • Meditate • Try a healthy new recipe • Play cards • Set your goals • Freshen your make-up • Hug someone • Rearrange some furniture • Go take a hike! • Help with homework • Light a fire or some candles • Say “STOP!” out loud • Organize your photos • Walk around your workplace • Try a new relaxation technique • Talk it over with someone • Get a head start on your taxes • S-t-r-e-t-c-h • Do a “Honey Do” • Say what’s on your mind • Go pick up your mail • Straighten a closet • Think • Do something nice for someone anonymously • Check the stock market • Plan a romantic encounter • Clean out a file • Tell someone how you really feel • When you become truly physically hungry, eat!

Source: Michelle May, M.D. From Eat What You Love, Love What You Eat. AmIHungry.com
1 2 3 4 5 82